Camera Obscured: Photographic Documentation And The Public Museum

Curated by: Vid Ingelevics

A look at the intersection of the histories of the public museum/gallery and the use of photography as document. This exhibition consists of 89 historical photographs taken inside museums, and drawn from the archives of major museums around the world, including the Metropolitan Museum of Art and the American Museum of Natural History, both in New York, the Louvre in Paris and the Royal Ontario Museum in Toronto.

The exhibition was curated by Vid Ingelevics, originated by The Photographers’ Gallery in London, England and is circulated in North America by Toronto Photographers Workshop.

Gallery Press Release
Media Coverage
Talk Poster and Invitation

 

Working on Flying Bird Group in Sanford Hall, The American Museum of Natural History, 1947. Photo: Alex J. Rota
Working on Flying Bird Group in Sanford Hall, The American Museum of Natural History, 1947. Photo: Alex J. Rota
Poster for the exhibition "Camera Obscured: Photographic Documentation and the Public Museum"
Poster for the exhibition "Camera Obscured: Photographic Documentation and the Public Museum"
Ray de Lucia installing models for the Forest Floor diorama in the Hall of Forests at the American Museum of Natural History new York, 1958. Photograph by museum staff photographer Alex J. Rota. From the exhibition Camera Obscured: Photographic Documentation and the Public Museum. Photograph courtesy The American Museum of Natural History, New York
Ray de Lucia installing models for the Forest Floor diorama in the Hall of Forests at the American Museum of Natural History new York, 1958. Photograph by museum staff photographer Alex J. Rota. From the exhibition Camera Obscured: Photographic Documentation and the Public Museum. Photograph courtesy The American Museum of Natural History, New York
Artist Frederick blaschke putting finishing touches on Neolithic Sun Worship diorama figure at The Field Museum of Natural History, Chicago. 1930. Photograph by museum staff photographer Charles Carpenter. From the exhibition Camera Obscured: Photographic Documentation and the Public Museum. Photograph courtesy The Field Museum of Natural History, Chicago.
Artist Frederick blaschke putting finishing touches on Neolithic Sun Worship diorama figure at The Field Museum of Natural History, Chicago. 1930. Photograph by museum staff photographer Charles Carpenter. From the exhibition Camera Obscured: Photographic Documentation and the Public Museum. Photograph courtesy The Field Museum of Natural History, Chicago.
Camera Obscured, Gallery Invitation - back
Gallery Invitation - back
Camera Obscured, Gallery Invitation - front
Gallery Invitation - front

Connections, meanings, and challenges.

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The Polygon Gallery continues the forty-year reputation of Presentation House Gallery in engaging the public with the most visionary artists of our time. A new waterfront landmark on Vancouver's North Shore, The Polygon offers a one-of-a-kind space to encounter contemporary visual art with a focus on photography.

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