Without A Word

Shelby Lee Adams

Berenice Abbott

Micha Bar-Am

Édouard Boubat

Pierre Boucher

Manuel Alvarez Bravo

William Claxton

Mike Disfarmer

Robert Doisneau

Bill Emrich

Morris Engel

Walker Evans

Phillip Jones Griffiths

Fred Herzog

Fan Ho

Miroslav Hucek

Graciela Iturbide

Johan van der Keuken

Jerome Leibling

Danny Lyon

Mary Ellen Mark

Tom Millea

Dirk Reinartz

Marc Riboud

Willie Ronis

Laurence Salzmann

Roy Schatt

David Seymour

W. Eugene Smith

J. Humphrey Spender

Peter Stackpole

Jacko Vassilev

Mariana Yampolsky

without a word presents a selection of portrait photographs from the private collection of Bill Wu, the first display of this remarkable, yet unknown, Vancouver collection of photography. Representing an international cross-section of acclaimed twentieth-century artists including Berenice Abbott, Robert Doisneau, Walker Evans, Graciela Iturbide, and Mary Ellen Mark, the exhibition includes some of modern photography’s most iconic and memorable portraits, with a specific focus on people caught in unguarded moments of contemplation and preoccupation. In many images, the camera seems to be unnoticed altogether, their subjects unstaged or taken in passing, highlighted by an ambiguous, perhaps unfamiliar relationship between figure and photographer. without a word speaks to a widely shared experience of having one’s picture taken without formal permission, and to the evocative power of stolen encounters that might reveal more about identity than might ever be found in a formally posed portrait.

Photo: Robert Doisneau, Le Petit Balcon, 1953. © Robert Doisneau.

Related event: Opening Reception: Without A Word

Manuel Alvarez Bravo, El Ensueño (The Daydream), 1931. gelatin silver print (printed later)
Manuel Alvarez Bravo, El Ensueño (The Daydream), 1931. gelatin silver print (printed later)
Robert Doisneau, L’Innocent, 1949. gelatin silver print (printed later)
Robert Doisneau, L’Innocent, 1949. gelatin silver print (printed later)
Jacko Vassilev, Motherhood, Bulgaria, 1988. ©Jacko Vassilev
Jacko Vassilev, Motherhood, Bulgaria, 1988. ©Jacko Vassilev
Marc Riboud, The antique dealers’ street, Peking. 1965. ©Marc Riboud. gelatin silver print
Marc Riboud, The antique dealers’ street, Peking. 1965. ©Marc Riboud. gelatin silver print
Peter Stackpole, Alaskan Immigrants Land Rush, 1936. gelatin silver print (printed later)
Peter Stackpole, Alaskan Immigrants Land Rush, 1936. gelatin silver print (printed later)
Berenice Abbott, Blossom Restaurant, 103 Bowery, Manhattan. 1935. gelatin silver print (printed later)
Berenice Abbott, Blossom Restaurant, 103 Bowery, Manhattan. 1935. gelatin silver print (printed later)
Fred Herzog, Dreamer, 1957. gelatin silver print
Fred Herzog, Dreamer, 1957. gelatin silver print
Walker Evans, Citizen in Downtown Havana, 1933. Edition 14/50. gelatin silver print (printed later)
Walker Evans, Citizen in Downtown Havana, 1933. Edition 14/50. gelatin silver print (printed later)
Dirk Reinartz, New York, 1975
Dirk Reinartz, New York, 1975. gelatin silver print

Connections, meanings, and challenges.

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